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15 March 2008

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I do not have any immediate answers to your question.I shall look into this and come back to you.

I have just returned from New York having spent an hour with the FAA to obtain a piggy back licence to sit alongside my JAA PPL to allow me to fly a N registered plane in France. I now have a "Temporary Airman's Certificate", the full one is shortly to arrive. It is my understanding that you need a FAA licence to fly a UK based N registered aircraft outside UK airspace and this was explained to me by the FAA in New York at JFK Airport Head Office. Now in possession of the temp cert they still require me to do a Bi annual flight review in the N reg aircraft with a FAA inspector before I venture outside of UK. airspace! There is another huge issue with N reg aircraft and that is whether VAT has been paid or was it exempt when it came into the EU. I know of a friend who has had French Customs go over all his aeroplane's paper work (Cessna 182) at Nantes and delay his onward journey by 4 hours!! Be careful. Am happy to talk about it if that would be helpful. Christopher.

Hi Dave

I am working my way towards the definitive answer for your question.
Please see the recent postings for the readers question "G reg aircraft" I believe that the same rules apply to your case. However I shall continue to research this for you.

The answer is probably NO.

FAR 61.3 states that an N-reg can be flown anywhere on a foreign license if the license has been issued (not validated etc but ISSUED) by the country owning the airspace.

So to fly an N-reg in France you need a French ISSUED license.

There is an alternative argument which is that a JAA license is good for all of JAA land, but strictly speaking this is wrong because 61.3 uses the word ISSUED.

Various people have asked the FAA for a ruling. I have collected two opposing views here
http://www.peter2000.co.uk/aviation/faa-nreg/imcr-nreg.html

So it is a grey area but my own view is that the answer is NO because anything else is bending the normal English meaning of the word "issued".

:)

Peter

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