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09 November 2013

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Hi Jaap

We have a couple of useful articles on landing at French uncontrolled airfields.

Speaking some French in these circumstances is obviously good airmanship but I am not sure that there is a legal requirement to say anything at all.

I will leave the 'professionals' to comment on that one.

Regards

Les

http://www.francoflyers.org/2008/01/uncontrolled-ai.html

http://www.francoflyers.org/french-radio-calls.html

Hello Jaap,

123.50 or not, always consult the Visual Approach Chart (carte VAC). You will find the answer at top left, where the radio frequencies are marked.

If you see "FR seulement/only", then avoid that aerodrome unless you speak French.

Example: https://www.sia.aviation-civile.gouv.fr/aip/enligne/PDF_AIPparSSection/VAC/AD/2/1312_AD-2.LFDK.pdf

No!

Envoyé de mon iPad

As the prefvious poster noted, if the VAC says "FR seulement" then you *MUST* be able to speak/understand aeronautical French to the extent that you can call all your positions and listen and UNDERSTAND any other traffic in the vicinity and make corrections etc. to your approach/departure as needed.

However, since the implementation of the EASA FCL licence, things appear to have become at the least confused and at worse, close to impossible. There are multiple accounts of Swiss aircraft being impounded by the Gendarmes on arrival at "FR seulement" airfields as, although the pilots spoke FLUENT French their new EASA part FCL licence (which is, of course Europe wide) only listed their language proficiency for German and English, thus the French deemed that they could not speak French as their European Licence did not state they could. What becomes even more difficult is that if you ask the DGAC they do not appear to be able to direct one to an examiner who can test/attest that you can speak French (level 4 or above) to get it added to the licence ....

As a non-French national with an aircraft based at a "FR seulement" airfield and UK-JAR licence I'm holding off exchanging it for an EASA Part FCL licence until this is clarified, as, although I speak French, my licence does not know that !!

Thanks John

That seems to be a major change of position in the language-requirement rules and it would be usful if any other readers can thow some light on the situation

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